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Why You Need a Classic Coleman Lantern at the Campground

Why You Need a Classic Coleman Lantern at the Campground

For this test, I used a Canon D6 DSLR camera mounted on a tripod. I used manual settings to keep the exposure the same for all three lanterns. Here they are starting from dimmest to brightest. During one of our parties, we put the Northstar near Grandma when she was chilly. This lantern does make a bit of a hissing sound when it is lit, and when the fuel is about to run out it makes a rather loud whistling noise. This classic 2-mantle lantern helps you light the way with a steady, Everbright light.
In “A” (Jan. – June) 1951 Coleman was making the 220D and 228D with green painted brass founts rather than nickel plated brass; compare to the Model 200, above right. The valve wheels on these lanterns are brown plastic and there is no decal on the side of the fount. Coleman only manufactured Model 228C after WWII, from late 1945 until early 1947, with some production overlap with Model 228D (below). Model 228C has the same features as Model 220C above including a green painted brass fount, screw-on pump cap, and yellow lighting instruction decal. This Model 220D, in Deems Burton’s collection, is almost like new and is dated B ’48, which we think means it was made in July-Dec of that year. The black handled Coleman reflector, 220D790, fits 220C-F models. Note the two pegs in the bottom bracket of the reflector to engage the corresponding holes in the globe cage bottom for attachment. Coleman battery lanterns are everything you need for ultra-bright light outdoors. Place your finger over the hole in the air intake tube where the generator just came out of. Use an air compressor to blow-out the burner assembly by holding the air nozzle under the burner cap(s) and blowing air up into the lantern. This will clear dirt and insect nests out of the tubes. That night I purchased an attractive looking limited edition National Park edition of the Coleman Northstar Propane Lantern–in park ranger khaki and green. I loved that lantern so much I bought……a few more…..and then a few more after that. As Justin put it, “It sounds like a little jet engine.” With all the negative things I’ve said about it, I will say, this lantern it bright! If you need to light a large area, this is the one you need. Other than that, I found that the LED lantern puts out enough light to accomplish most tasks. This lantern, in Ed Franklin’s collection, is date stamped November 1951. Coleman made this version of their L327 model for their Sunshine Products subsidiary circa 1929 based on a parts comparison to dated Quick-Lite lanterns. The baffle plate (lower image) is unplated steel rather than nickel plated brass and lacks Sunshine Products stamping. This lantern is date stamped 7 9 (September ’27), six months before the L220/L228 lanterns were introduced.